DESIGNAHOLIC

thisbigcity:

ryanpanos:

Dark Park

Gary Barnett, the founder and president of Extell Development Company, likely knew what he was getting into when he showed up to a recent town hall on super-tall skyscrapers rising in New York. The hundreds of people who crowded into a room at the New York Public Library were not there to praise these soaring towers. They were there to see what could be done to stop more from rising.

The town hall, which was organized by Manhattan Community Board 5, was focused on the long, dark shadows that these new buildings will cast deep into Central Park. Barnett’s company is behind two of the projects, but on the rainy February night, he was the face of all of them.

One of Extell’s towers is the nearly completed Christian de Portzamparc–designed One57, which is already blocking sunlight in Central Park. A panelist at the event, journalist Warren St. John, has experienced this firsthand. He told the crowd about the shadows that fell across the park as he tried to play with his daughter on a recent afternoon.

The shadow effect of the rising city.

(via study-the-city-deactivated20140)

702 notes

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rudygodinez:

Jean Prouve, Maisons Coques, (1950-1952)

During the assembly work for the Mame Printing Works. Prouve made an observation that he later described as follows: “One beautiful day around lunchtime, I saw thirty workers taking a break. They were sitting and eating among the stored shed-roof elements – and they all told me the same thing: “We don’’t know why, but we feel at ease here.” This was the birth of the shell houses, or maisons coques, who’s prototype Prouve presented in Paris at the 1951 exhibition Arts Menagers. Basically, this construction principle entailed no more than creating a series of “shells” made of bent shed roof elements, which rest on facades or interior walls. Not much later, numerous variations on such “shell houses” were completed.

(via grmhrtdesigns)

622 notes

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semioticapocalypse:

Unique experimental plastic house. Leningrad, USSR. 1961
[::SemAp FB || SemAp G+::]

semioticapocalypse:

Unique experimental plastic house. Leningrad, USSR. 1961

[::SemAp FB || SemAp G+::]

(via grmhrtdesigns)

648 notes

Mar 11 2014
atlurbanist:

Saying goodbye, slowly, to the suburban experiment
Lewis Mumford (1895-1990) was an interesting guy. Among many other things, we was a fan of cities and good urban planning. He also gave a warning voice against the rise of car-centric suburbia as it was happening in the 20th century. Here’s a quote from him, emphasis from me:

In the suburb one might live and die without marring the image of an innocent world, except when some shadow of evil fell over a column in the newspaper. Thus the suburb served as an asylum for the preservation of illusion. Here domesticity could prosper, oblivious of the pervasive regimentation beyond. This was not merely a child-centered environment; it was based on a childish view of the world, in which reality was sacrificed to the pleasure principle.

Perspective: car-centric, suburban sprawl is a construct of the 20th century that clashes with the way human settlements developed and thrived for millennia. It reconstructed our living spaces on a scale meant for cars, making our neighborhoods inhospitable to the kind of pedestrian connectivity that we need for healthy interactivity with our environments and with  each other.
Some day that sprawl will be fully retro-fitted as the kind of walkable, compact environment that puts people in face-to-face contact more so than what happens now via windshield perspectives; respecting both basic human needs and also the land-space needs of nature. This is happening now slowly, in our lifetimes, but the damage is significant and the repair will take many years.
Future generations will look back on the suburban experiment of the 20th century as the bizarre, unnatural thing that it was. Knowing that makes me feel a bit better about how slow the process is of undoing the physical and psychological detritus of the experiment.

atlurbanist:

Saying goodbye, slowly, to the suburban experiment

Lewis Mumford (1895-1990) was an interesting guy. Among many other things, we was a fan of cities and good urban planning. He also gave a warning voice against the rise of car-centric suburbia as it was happening in the 20th century. Here’s a quote from him, emphasis from me:

In the suburb one might live and die without marring the image of an innocent world, except when some shadow of evil fell over a column in the newspaper. Thus the suburb served as an asylum for the preservation of illusion. Here domesticity could prosper, oblivious of the pervasive regimentation beyond. This was not merely a child-centered environment; it was based on a childish view of the world, in which reality was sacrificed to the pleasure principle.

Perspective: car-centric, suburban sprawl is a construct of the 20th century that clashes with the way human settlements developed and thrived for millennia. It reconstructed our living spaces on a scale meant for cars, making our neighborhoods inhospitable to the kind of pedestrian connectivity that we need for healthy interactivity with our environments and with  each other.

Some day that sprawl will be fully retro-fitted as the kind of walkable, compact environment that puts people in face-to-face contact more so than what happens now via windshield perspectives; respecting both basic human needs and also the land-space needs of nature. This is happening now slowly, in our lifetimes, but the damage is significant and the repair will take many years.

Future generations will look back on the suburban experiment of the 20th century as the bizarre, unnatural thing that it was. Knowing that makes me feel a bit better about how slow the process is of undoing the physical and psychological detritus of the experiment.

(via thisbigcity)

621 notes

Mar 07 2014
ernegonz:

Remember…

ernegonz:

Remember…

(via monolithos)

135 notes

Mar 03 2014
jonasgrossmann:

raphael soriano… polito house, los angeles (1940)photos by julius shulman@ primo

jonasgrossmann:

raphael soriano… polito house, los angeles (1940)
photos by julius shulman
@ primo

(via grmhrtdesigns)

99 notes

Feb 06 2014

Anonymous said: Hi frank miss you hope you all are doing great...oxoxoxo call me so we can get together soon we miss you guys very much..

Who is this? Please send an email….

Sep 24 2013
preciousandfregilethings:

arqvac:
Le Modulor at Unité d’Habitation, Marseille, by Le Corbusier 

preciousandfregilethings:

arqvac:

Le Modulor at Unité d’Habitation, Marseille, by Le Corbusier 

(Source: facebook.com, via thomortiz)

196 notes

Aug 22 2013
Aug 12 2013

(Source: ruleof3)

8 notes

Aug 10 2013

(Source: kevc, via thomortiz)

2,586 notes

Jul 31 2013
Jul 27 2013
Jul 15 2013
daveroma:

Imagination.  (at Long Beach New york)

daveroma:

Imagination. (at Long Beach New york)

1 note

Jul 11 2013
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